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Chip Salvage Head: Removes Good Chips From Bad Modules for Reuse

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041891D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bechard, RR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article discloses a chip-removal tool for use in removing good chips from defective modules. The tool comprises a manifold 10 having a number of openings therein equal to the number of chips 11 to be removed from the substrate 12. The manifold 10 is positioned within a body 13. The body 13 is provided with internal stops 14 which prevent the manifold from being retracted more than a specified distance from the substrate. The body 13 is further provided with a substrate clamp 15 for holding the substrate 12 against the bottom of the body 13. A hollow bellows 16 is mounted over the chips a set distance and has its hollow interior connected to a vacuum line 17 and to the opening in the manifold 10.

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Chip Salvage Head: Removes Good Chips From Bad Modules for Reuse

This article discloses a chip-removal tool for use in removing good chips from defective modules. The tool comprises a manifold 10 having a number of openings therein equal to the number of chips 11 to be removed from the substrate 12. The manifold 10 is positioned within a body 13. The body 13 is provided with internal stops 14 which prevent the manifold from being retracted more than a specified distance from the substrate. The body 13 is further provided with a substrate clamp 15 for holding the substrate 12 against the bottom of the body 13. A hollow bellows 16 is mounted over the chips a set distance and has its hollow interior connected to a vacuum line 17 and to the opening in the manifold 10. When the substrate is subjected to a controlled heat level, for example, from a solder fountain, vacuum is applied to the interior of the bellows. Once the solder backing between the chips and the substrate becomes molten, the chips 11 are lifted from the substrate the set distance, after which the bellows collapse at a controlled rate up to the steps 14. The depopulated substrate can now be dropped, and the salvaged chips reused.

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