Browse Prior Art Database

E-Beam Aperture for Variable Shapes and Non-Orthogonal Lines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041913D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Finnes, SJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In present E-beam apparatus at least two apertures are used. The first is an upper square aperture internal to the machine, which forms a square beam. The second is an imaging aperture that is used to shape the final output beam. The imaging apertures shown in Fig. 1, when used with a square first aperture of a two-aperture E-beam apparatus, allow the generation of a number of pattern shapes, shown in Fig. 2, some of which are not obtainable with other known imaging aperture configurations. These imaging apertures can be used without changes in the beam-shaping circuitry and/or shaping plate geometry. Only a small beam deflection of the square beam formed by the first aperture is required to realize any one of the pattern shapes of Fig. 2, thus substantially eliminating beam distortion.

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E-Beam Aperture for Variable Shapes and Non-Orthogonal Lines

In present E-beam apparatus at least two apertures are used. The first is an upper square aperture internal to the machine, which forms a square beam. The second is an imaging aperture that is used to shape the final output beam. The imaging apertures shown in Fig. 1, when used with a square first aperture of a two-aperture E-beam apparatus, allow the generation of a number of pattern shapes, shown in Fig. 2, some of which are not obtainable with other known imaging aperture configurations. These imaging apertures can be used without changes in the beam-shaping circuitry and/or shaping plate geometry. Only a small beam deflection of the square beam formed by the first aperture is required to realize any one of the pattern shapes of Fig. 2, thus substantially eliminating beam distortion. Other imaging apertures can be created and used to generate the slopes shown in Fig. 2. The principle for creating an imaging aperture that conforms to this teaching is to compose an enclosed area to form an enclosed polygon, for example, by translation and/or stretch from the sides, differently rotated rectangles At least two of the sides of the imaging aperture should be at right angles to each other and parallel to the edges of the square beam formed by the first aperture while the other sides may be at any angle to the sides of the square beam.

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