Browse Prior Art Database

Using Displaywriter to Print SCRIPT/VS Final Form Documents

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041933D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 4 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Agnew, PW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

BACKGROUND Recently, IBM has announced a program named Host Displaywriter Document Interchange (HDDI). HDDI allows a Displaywriter user to invoke two new functions. The first function transfers documents back and forth between the Displaywriter's diskette and an attached VM/370 system's disk. The second function transforms documents back and forth between the Displaywriter's editable document form called OIIA L3 DCA, abbreviated here as L3, and an editable document form used on VM/370, called SCRIPT/VS. For example, the two functions allow a secretary to enter a document using a Displaywriter and then have a principal use a data processing terminal to edit it. The principal can then send it back to the Displaywriter for further editing, and so on.

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Using Displaywriter to Print SCRIPT/VS Final Form Documents

BACKGROUND Recently, IBM has announced a program named Host Displaywriter Document Interchange (HDDI). HDDI allows a Displaywriter user to invoke two new functions. The first function transfers documents back and forth between the Displaywriter's diskette and an attached VM/370 system's disk. The second function transforms documents back and forth between the Displaywriter's editable document form called OIIA L3 DCA, abbreviated here as L3, and an editable document form used on VM/370, called SCRIPT/VS. For example, the two functions allow a secretary to enter a document using a Displaywriter and then have a principal use a data processing terminal to edit it. The principal can then send it back to the Displaywriter for further editing, and so on. This is possible because the document is kept in one or the other of the two editable forms: L3 and SCRIPT/VS. Either the Displaywriter or the VM/370 system can be used to format the document at any point. That is, either system can be used to interpret the controls that exist in the corresponding editable form of the document and can prepare a final form of the document. For example, the editable form specifies places in the document where a line must end, other places in the document where a page must end, and what text is to be used as top and bottom margin text. The editable form also specifies which parts of the document the formatter is to adjust (by flowing as many words up onto each line as will fit in the specified line length) and specifies which parts of the document the formatter is to justify (by inserting blanks between words to create a straight right hand margin). Either formatting program adjusts text, that is, makes line ending decisions based on points where it runs out of space on a line, as well as based on points where the editable form specifies that a new line must start. Either formatting program makes page ending decisions based on points where it runs out of space on a page, as well as based on points where the editable form specifies that a new page must start. The formatting program puts top margin text at the top of each page and puts bottom margin text at the bottom of each page. The formatting program may, where requested, justify the text. The final form of a document is suitable for printing, but it is not suitable for further editing. Any editing would require that the line ending decisions and page ending decisions be made again, but the information that is necessary for this purpose has been lost. This is why the transform programs must operate on editable documents. THE PROBLEM There are many situations in which a user may want to start with a final form document that was produced by the SCRIPT/VS formatter on the VM/370 system, transform it to a form that a Displaywriter can handle, and print it on the Displaywriter's printer. One such situation is that the user may have an editable form of...