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Automatic Restart for Microprocessors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041947D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blue, LA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a method for detecting and automatically starting an incorrectly halted microprocessor. At least two instructions are executed by the microprocessor. As a result of executing the instructions, a pulse (Vin) is generated. If the pulse is not generated within a predetermined period of time, a reset pulse is generated and is used to reset the microprocessor. Preferable, the microprocessor is made to execute the instructions at the beginning of each task. The pulse is then sent to a detection/reset circuit. The circuit, in turn, generates the reset pulse which is used to reset the microprocessor. The figure shows the detection/reset circuit. The microprocessor-generated pulse (Vin) discharge C1 to ground, holding the voltage across C1 below the reference set by R8 and R9.

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Automatic Restart for Microprocessors

This article describes a method for detecting and automatically starting an incorrectly halted microprocessor. At least two instructions are executed by the microprocessor. As a result of executing the instructions, a pulse (Vin) is generated. If the pulse is not generated within a predetermined period of time, a reset pulse is generated and is used to reset the microprocessor. Preferable, the microprocessor is made to execute the instructions at the beginning of each task. The pulse is then sent to a detection/reset circuit. The circuit, in turn, generates the reset pulse which is used to reset the microprocessor. The figure shows the detection/reset circuit. The microprocessor-generated pulse (Vin) discharge C1 to ground, holding the voltage across C1 below the reference set by R8 and R9. The output of M2 is high and M3 is low, holding Q1 off. If the time between the microprocessor-generated pulse exceeds the R1C1 time constant, C1 charges above the threshold and the output of M2 goes low. This discharges C2, and M3 goes high. This signals a reset to the microprocessor, and turns Q1 on. Q1 discharges C1, and the output of M2 is allowed to go high, charging C2. When C2 charges above a predetermined threshold, the output of M3 switches low, and Q1 turns off. The R2C2 time constant sets the reset pulse width. The microprocessor is now restarted, and the detection circuit is again enabled to detect the absence of microprocessor...