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Altering Ink Wettability of Impression Fabrics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041981D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haney, GH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes how the amount of ink that can be loaded into impression fabrics can be controlled via plasma pre-treatment. A desirable feature in the production of inked impression fabrics is the ability to alter the amount of ink which could be put (or loaded) into those fabrics so that the number of characters being printed out can be increased (or decreased) beyond what is presently available. The current state of the art in the manufacturing of inked impression fabrics allows the amount of ink being loaded therein to be controlled by a number of variables. However, there exists a "ceiling" or maximum percentage of ink which can be loaded after which surface ink is produced. This excess ink causes smudging and other undesirable effects.

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Altering Ink Wettability of Impression Fabrics

This article describes how the amount of ink that can be loaded into impression fabrics can be controlled via plasma pre-treatment. A desirable feature in the production of inked impression fabrics is the ability to alter the amount of ink which could be put (or loaded) into those fabrics so that the number of characters being printed out can be increased (or decreased) beyond what is presently available. The current state of the art in the manufacturing of inked impression fabrics allows the amount of ink being loaded therein to be controlled by a number of variables. However, there exists a "ceiling" or maximum percentage of ink which can be loaded after which surface ink is produced. This excess ink causes smudging and other undesirable effects. By plasma treatment of the fabric beforehand, the individual filament surfaces in the fiber bundles can be "roughed up", causing the amount of loaded (non-surface) ink to increase. The filaments could also be plasma-treated (deposition coating, e.g.) such that less ink would be put in, thereby providing very useful fabric ribbon products.

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