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Component for Optimization of Cooling Air Flow

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041999D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Comerford, LD: AUTHOR

Abstract

In so-called "card-on-board" arrangements of circuit cards, a component can be used to optimize cooling air flow on each card and for the system as a whole. As shown in Fig. 1, the component consists of a ribbon of flexible, nonconducting material, such as a plastic. The ribbon has a cross section which tapers toward one edge. The taper is sufficient to make one edge semi-rigid while the other edge is compliant. The width of the ribbon should be slightly greater than the interboard spacing, as shown in the cross section of Fig. 2. The ribbon is attachable to a circuit board by either of two methods. The ribbon can be made with embedded metal pins (Fig. 1) on spacings that allow the pins to be inserted in holes in the circuit boards, or holes in the ribbon can be shipped over pins mounted on the circuit boards.

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Component for Optimization of Cooling Air Flow

In so-called "card-on-board" arrangements of circuit cards, a component can be used to optimize cooling air flow on each card and for the system as a whole. As shown in Fig. 1, the component consists of a ribbon of flexible, nonconducting material, such as a plastic. The ribbon has a cross section which tapers toward one edge. The taper is sufficient to make one edge semi-rigid while the other edge is compliant. The width of the ribbon should be slightly greater than the interboard spacing, as shown in the cross section of Fig. 2. The ribbon is attachable to a circuit board by either of two methods. The ribbon can be made with embedded metal pins (Fig. 1) on spacings that allow the pins to be inserted in holes in the circuit boards, or holes in the ribbon can be shipped over pins mounted on the circuit boards. The use of the component is illustrated in the cross section of Fig. 2 and in Figs. 3 to 5 which are top views of possible patterns for the use of the component on circuit cards. Strips of the component can be arranged on circuit cards in order to reduce air flow over a card, as shown in Fig. 3 (increasing air flow over other cards), cause air flow to be channeled to a hot component on a card, as shown in Fig. 4, or change the path of air flow over a card to increase turbulence or velocity of air flow, as shown in Fig. 5. The structure of the component allows these options by forming walls or ducts whose bounda...