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MATERIAL FOR VOLTAGE-SELECTIVE AND FREQUENCY-SELECTIVE STORAGE AT GaAs LASER WAVELENGTHS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042006D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bjorklund, GC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The R' center in LiF exhibits a Stark effect under the action of homogeneous electric fields which significantly enhances the storage density of spectral hole-burning optical memories. Instead of splitting or shifting, spectral holes in this system broaden and reduce in height as the electric field is increased. An example of this approach is as follows: One or more holes are burned in the R' center in LiF in the zero field. As the field is increased, the holes slowly merge into the inhomogeneous line until, at about 10 KV/cm, the holes are unobservable. Then a new group of independent spectral holes can be written in the sample at this field (10 KV/cm). When the field is lowered to zero, the original sequence of holes burned in the zero field reappears.

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MATERIAL FOR VOLTAGE-SELECTIVE AND FREQUENCY-SELECTIVE STORAGE AT GaAs LASER WAVELENGTHS

The R' center in LiF exhibits a Stark effect under the action of homogeneous electric fields which significantly enhances the storage density of spectral hole- burning optical memories. Instead of splitting or shifting, spectral holes in this system broaden and reduce in height as the electric field is increased. An example of this approach is as follows: One or more holes are burned in the R' center in LiF in the zero field. As the field is increased, the holes slowly merge into the inhomogeneous line until, at about 10 KV/cm, the holes are unobservable. Then a new group of independent spectral holes can be written in the sample at this field (10 KV/cm). When the field is lowered to zero, the original sequence of holes burned in the zero field reappears. This effect can be repeated many times without deterioration of holes at each field. This principle can be extended to a number of different homogeneous electric fields, thereby resulting in an increase in storage density over the zero field value by as much as 5 to 10 times.

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