Browse Prior Art Database

Adjacent Data Track Interleaving

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042018D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Condron, MR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Using tetraorthogonal buried servo schemes, it is found that the optimum position error signal (PES) dynamic range is achieved with a servo read element of magnetic core width equal to twice the servo track width. In this system, the data track pitch also equals that of the buried servo. From Fig. 1, it is seen that the servo element will span the equivalent distance of two data tracks. Depending upon the distance between data and servo elements in a side-by-side dual element head, the servo element in the on-track condition could end up over two adjacent data tracks or over one complete data track and part of two other data tracks. Since the data tracks reside over the buried servo tracks, the servo element will also read the recorded data as noise. The data tracks are normally recorded with a clock derived from a reference.

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Adjacent Data Track Interleaving

Using tetraorthogonal buried servo schemes, it is found that the optimum position error signal (PES) dynamic range is achieved with a servo read element of magnetic core width equal to twice the servo track width. In this system, the data track pitch also equals that of the buried servo. From Fig. 1, it is seen that the servo element will span the equivalent distance of two data tracks. Depending upon the distance between data and servo elements in a side-by-side dual element head, the servo element in the on-track condition could end up over two adjacent data tracks or over one complete data track and part of two other data tracks. Since the data tracks reside over the buried servo tracks, the servo element will also read the recorded data as noise. The data tracks are normally recorded with a clock derived from a reference. In this case, the reference would be the servo reference frequency. Thus the resultant data would be read back as coherent noise, and the possibility of having two or three adjacent data transitions happen at the same time (i.e., simultaneously pass through the servo element magnetic gap) would be maximized. In the worst case, these two or three transitions could be of the same polarity and could add algebraically to produce interference of increased magnitude. In the best case, the transitions could be of such polarity as to add to near zero interference. When alternate data tracks are recorded using 180OE d...