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Browse Prior Art Database

Remote IPL of Diskette-Driven Computers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042081D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Milling, PE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Contemporary personal computers are normally programmed through attached diskette drives and diskettes insertable into the drive units. Such computers can be configured by a variety (or library) of diskettes to perform many different processing functions. When such computers are linked through communication networks, it is feasible to share diskettes and diskette drives through the network, and thereby realize cost savings. This article concerns a method of diskette sharing which has the advantage of not requiring specific modification or adaptation of existing diskettes and computers. This method presently termed "remote IPL" involves a two-step process.

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Remote IPL of Diskette-Driven Computers

Contemporary personal computers are normally programmed through attached diskette drives and diskettes insertable into the drive units. Such computers can be configured by a variety (or library) of diskettes to perform many different processing functions. When such computers are linked through communication networks, it is feasible to share diskettes and diskette drives through the network, and thereby realize cost savings. This article concerns a method of diskette sharing which has the advantage of not requiring specific modification or adaptation of existing diskettes and computers. This method presently termed "remote IPL" involves a two-step process. The system requesting access to a remote file first operates through a "bootstrapping" program resident in its ROM (read-only memory) to request loading of a "virtual diskette" program from a diskette drive attached directly to a remote system. The request is made through the network and requires the resident program to establish a communication session between the local and remote systems. The virtual diskette program, in turn, operates to establish one or more communication sessions with the remote system (this may be either the same remote system or a different one) for loading the program and data which the local system user requires. In these loading operations, the incoming information passes transparently to the local system storage as if derived through a locally a...