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Soliton Shooter Logic

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042091D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rajeevakumar, TV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Injecting a bias voltage at only one end of a long Josephson junction provides input/output isolation, permitting the device to act as a shooter, and when interconnected with similar devices to perform combinatorial logic. A soliton device (long junction) transmits solitons in either direction, depending on whether a pulse is applied at one or the other end. This poses a problem when it is desired to collect solitons emanating from other circuits. If solitons are injected into a string of devices (long junctions), they propagate in both directions, activating circuits that should normally not be activated. In other words, the device lacks input/output isolation. A device with input/output isolation (the shooter) is shown in Fig. 1.

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Soliton Shooter Logic

Injecting a bias voltage at only one end of a long Josephson junction provides input/output isolation, permitting the device to act as a shooter, and when interconnected with similar devices to perform combinatorial logic. A soliton device (long junction) transmits solitons in either direction, depending on whether a pulse is applied at one or the other end. This poses a problem when it is desired to collect solitons emanating from other circuits. If solitons are injected into a string of devices (long junctions), they propagate in both directions, activating circuits that should normally not be activated. In other words, the device lacks input/output isolation. A device with input/output isolation (the shooter) is shown in Fig. 1. It is a long junction 1 with bias current injected only over a portion 2 of the junction length, on the input side. Powering may be achieved through direct injection, or AC-wise as in the flux tube. The phase p of the junction as a function of x and the potential energy (vs. p) are shown in Fig.
2. A soliton will propagate through the junction only if presented at the input but not in the reverse direction. The shooter is also able to perform logic functions, since a soliton is propagated if the bias (IT) is applied, but will not propagate if IT=0. Thus, a gating action can be achieved. The AND function is realized if such shooters are connected in series. Here, the IT bias signals represent the logical inputs, an...