Browse Prior Art Database

Hand-Held Data Input Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042183D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kennedy, PJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A pistol-grip type of hand-held device is described for entering data into a digital computer or other data handling apparatus requiring the input of data from a human operator. This device has various advantages over the conventional typewriter keyboard-type of data entry device. The hand-held data input device is indicated at 10 in the drawing. It may be made of wood, plastic, or the like. It includes a slidable control button 11 which is slid up and back by the thumb of the human operator to select the desired number, alphabetic letter or other symbol to be entered into a computer 12.

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Hand-Held Data Input Device

A pistol-grip type of hand-held device is described for entering data into a digital computer or other data handling apparatus requiring the input of data from a human operator. This device has various advantages over the conventional typewriter keyboard-type of data entry device. The hand-held data input device is indicated at 10 in the drawing. It may be made of wood, plastic, or the like. It includes a slidable control button 11 which is slid up and back by the thumb of the human operator to select the desired number, alphabetic letter or other symbol to be entered into a computer 12. It further includes a push-button switch 13 which is depressed by the index finger of the human operator to tell the computer that the character selected by the slidable button 11 is the character he wishes to retain as a valid character for the data he is entering. In other words, push button 13 is a confirmation button for indicating that the selected character is the desired character. The data input device 10 is connected to the computer 12 by means of a light-weight flexible electrical cable 14 and an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter 15. The slidable button 11 is connected to and causes movement of the movable element of a potentiometer. The position of the button 11 selects the amount of voltage picked off from the potentiometer and supplied to the A/D converter 15. Converter 15 converts this voltage value into a plural bit digital signal, for example, an 8-bit signal, which is supplied to the computer 12 and is coded to correspond to the character selected by the position of the slidable button 11. The computer 12 drives a video display terminal 16 which displays the selected character at the position indicated by a display cursor 17. The human operator then decides if the displayed character is the character which he wishes to use or not. If not, then he would move the slidable button 11 until the desired character is displayed at the cursor location. Then he would press the confirmation button 13 with his index finger. This would signal the computer 12 to accept that character and to advance the cursor 17 to its next position. The human operator th...