Browse Prior Art Database

Automatically Trace, Store and Retrieve Linear Device Banks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042200D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Begun, RM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Methods for tracing chips during the manufacturing cycle are necessary. Currently, chips are grouped by part number and stored within a linear device bank (LDB). These LDBs are manually stored and retrieved as required. The arrangement disclosed here is a method for automating this storage and retrieval process. Silicon chips play a major role in many manufacturing processes. They are assigned and recorded by a host computer through the various stages of the process. The handling of chips throughout the process is important for maintaining traceability. In this article, a computer controlled automated library is set forth for handling chips via LDBs. Chips are currently stored in LDBs, as shown in Fig. 1, which contain up to 120 chips each. There are 600 to 800 active chip part numbers to be considered.

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Automatically Trace, Store and Retrieve Linear Device Banks

Methods for tracing chips during the manufacturing cycle are necessary. Currently, chips are grouped by part number and stored within a linear device bank (LDB). These LDBs are manually stored and retrieved as required. The arrangement disclosed here is a method for automating this storage and retrieval process. Silicon chips play a major role in many manufacturing processes. They are assigned and recorded by a host computer through the various stages of the process. The handling of chips throughout the process is important for maintaining traceability. In this article, a computer controlled automated library is set forth for handling chips via LDBs. Chips are currently stored in LDBs, as shown in Fig. 1, which contain up to 120 chips each. There are 600 to 800 active chip part numbers to be considered. Each LDB stores chips with single part numbers. Each LDB is assigned an unique serial number. During the order make-up (OMU), the host computer assigns particular chips from particular LDBs to a particular job. It is the OMU operator's responsibility to kit the assigned LDBs which carry the assigned chips to make up a job. From logistic studies of chip history and future growth, an alternative method of handling LDBs has been established. This method utilizes a modularized storage library. Each storage library can automatically verify, store, and retrieve LDBs under computer control. Referring to Fig. 2, the machine complex consists of the following: (A) An automatic device counter 10 to verify LDB serial numbers and to map chip locations on LDBs prior to entering storage. (B) Two X, Y, Z numerically controlled shuttle assemblies 12 on each machine, one located on the back side of the library to store LDBs, and the other located on the front side to retrieve them. There are three independent axes on each shuttle assembly. Each axis is driven independently by a DC servo motor. The motors are mounted below the library to eliminate high speed flexing of traveling cables. The three independent axes are: (1) Y axis - the platform travels up and down along the library. The motion is provided by turning the two lead screws against the two end nuts mounted on the platform. The two lead screws are driven by two synchronized DC servo motors. (2) X axis - the shuttle travels left and right on the platform. It is attached to a timing belt which is driven by pulleys and a vertical spline. The vertical spline is driven by a DC servo motor. (3) Z axis - shuttle LDB in and out of storage library and onto output trays. Motions consist of the following: (a) Retrieve LDBs from storage library, go to assigned storage slot, pull the LDB out from slot, and power roll it...