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Browse Prior Art Database

Multiple I/O Cryogenic Light Guide Array

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042201D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article relates generally to optical fibers and more specifically to arrays of such fibers which provide a multiple I/O for the optical addressing of cryogenically cooled VLSI circuits. The addressing of the various candidates for a super high-speed computer, which include superconducting junctions, GaAs, and HEMT (high electron mobility transistor), by transmitting light signals from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures requires a special design to withstand the large temperature differential. In general, presently available solutions are limited in materials selection and multiple I/O capabilities. This article describes a system which makes possible a multiple addressing capability, and has a high degree of thermal stability and the ability to withstand repeated thermal cycling. Fig.

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Multiple I/O Cryogenic Light Guide Array

This article relates generally to optical fibers and more specifically to arrays of such fibers which provide a multiple I/O for the optical addressing of cryogenically cooled VLSI circuits. The addressing of the various candidates for a super high-speed computer, which include superconducting junctions, GaAs, and HEMT (high electron mobility transistor), by transmitting light signals from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures requires a special design to withstand the large temperature differential. In general, presently available solutions are limited in materials selection and multiple I/O capabilities. This article describes a system which makes possible a multiple addressing capability, and has a high degree of thermal stability and the ability to withstand repeated thermal cycling. Fig. 1 shows a polyimide laminate 1 containing a cloth of glass fibers [1] in which an array of light guides 2 is substituted for the warp of the material. Guides 2 are approximately 100 mm in diameter and are spaced center-to-center by approximately 200 mm. Perpendicular to the array of light guides 2 is an interwoven structure of glass fibers 3 (not of optical grade). The addition of the interwoven fibers 3 provides excellent thermal stability. The thermal coefficient of expansion may be reduced to as little as 2 x 10-3 for a temperature change of 300 degrees Kelvin [2]. The resulting array has several attributes that make it an exc...