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Folding Leg Lift Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042223D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DeBeaumont, JR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This leg mechanism can support an object, such as a CRT display head, at a desired height and altitude. The legs fold into a base element as they are moved to the retracted position, where they consume very little space. The basic element of the lift mechanism is a chain-like leg able to flex through a limited angle at two corners of each link. See Fig. 1. Flexing is limited in one direction so that the assembly forms a straight leg. Flexing is limited in the other direction so that the assembly assumes a radius R, as it flexes through a 90Πbend. R is kept small so that the assembly takes up minimum vertical space in or beneath a display unit or similar device. Two legs must be used in opposition to provide horizontal stability, as shown in Fig. 2.

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Folding Leg Lift Mechanism

This leg mechanism can support an object, such as a CRT display head, at a desired height and altitude. The legs fold into a base element as they are moved to the retracted position, where they consume very little space. The basic element of the lift mechanism is a chain-like leg able to flex through a limited angle at two corners of each link. See Fig. 1. Flexing is limited in one direction so that the assembly forms a straight leg. Flexing is limited in the other direction so that the assembly assumes a radius R, as it flexes through a 90OE bend. R is kept small so that the assembly takes up minimum vertical space in or beneath a display unit or similar device. Two legs must be used in opposition to provide horizontal stability, as shown in Fig. 2. In order to minimize friction, the leg assemblies are supported by rollers at points A. The leg assemblies are self- supporting as they pass through radius R, requiring only horizontal stabilization at surfaces B. Movement of the two legs must be synchronized. One way is to locate a single pinion between two racks. Each rack is attached to the lowest link of one leg. Fig. 3 shows a top view of this dual-rack, single-pinion arrangement. A constant force spring is shown acting on each leg. A constant torque spring motor or electric motor can also be used to drive the pinion directly.

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