Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Switching of Computer Keyboards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042227D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bradley, DJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In non-English speaking countries, computer users, particularly users of personal computers, may employ keyboards adapted to the native language and programs written in English. Since the character sets for these may be different, it is desirable to provide such users with facilities to switch sets (e.g., allowing for use of the native set when typing simple word process text and the English set when entering program commands). It is further desired that such switching be simple for the user and inexpensive to implement (particularly for personal computers). The technique described below provides such facilities.

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Dynamic Switching of Computer Keyboards

In non-English speaking countries, computer users, particularly users of personal computers, may employ keyboards adapted to the native language and programs written in English. Since the character sets for these may be different, it is desirable to provide such users with facilities to switch sets (e.g., allowing for use of the native set when typing simple word process text and the English set when entering program commands). It is further desired that such switching be simple for the user and inexpensive to implement (particularly for personal computers). The technique described below provides such facilities. For this purpose, the subject technique employs "software switching" in association with a modification to the Keyboard Interface Program (the program which translates key depressions into associated ASCII [American Standard Code for Information Interchange] character codes which are necessarily different for the native language and English). In the environmental context of the IBM Personal Computer keyboard, a user employing the subject technique would switch from his/her native character set to the English set by depressing three keys simultaneously, CTL-ALT-F1, and return to the native set by depressing another three key combination, CTL-ALT-F2 (CTL and ALT are control keys and F1/F2 are "soft" function selection keys). In response to the depression of these control combinations, the modified Keyboard Interface...