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Secure Display Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042315D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appel, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a method and a typical terminal system to protect classified information from casual or furtive observation on a display terminal. Securing data on a display system with centralized files accessed through terminals requires that the data to be secured must have been tagged or labeled in some way. A method is to use keyword or key-string locks as the first characters in a file or message. When the centralized files of a terminal system are accessed, the data sent from the host computer are firstly received by a character detector. If the received data are recognized as not classified, the terminal will operate in the usual manner, sending the data to the screen buffer and then to the video character generator for the display on the screen of the CRT.

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Secure Display Terminal

This article describes a method and a typical terminal system to protect classified information from casual or furtive observation on a display terminal. Securing data on a display system with centralized files accessed through terminals requires that the data to be secured must have been tagged or labeled in some way. A method is to use keyword or key-string locks as the first characters in a file or message. When the centralized files of a terminal system are accessed, the data sent from the host computer are firstly received by a character detector. If the received data are recognized as not classified, the terminal will operate in the usual manner, sending the data to the screen buffer and then to the video character generator for the display on the screen of the CRT. Conversely, the reception of classified data, when detected by the character detector, will cause the inhibit circuit to halt the display on the screen.

A signal is given to the user either on the display screen or through separate security attachment by the classified signal generator, warning the user that classified information was inhibited from being displayed. When the user feels that the situation is secure, he types a coded string of characters to open the inhibit circuit. Software solutions are possible when special versions of peek, browse, xedit or other functions are provided with key string locks. These special versions will ask a user for the key string befo...