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Minimum Redundancy High Frequency Dictionary Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042323D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carlgren, RG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This technique minimizes the storage requirement to represent a dictionary of most often used words in a language-independent manner. A technique for improving the performance of spelling verification on systems which must keep the related dictionary data base on secondary storage is to make use of an in-storage list of the most frequently used words in a language. A relatively small number of words typically can be used to validate the spelling of a very high percentage of words used in text. The present technique is to use the identical structure of the main dictionary on secondary storage for the high frequency dictionary. The high frequency dictionary is then actually stored in an independent segment of the main dictionary.

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Minimum Redundancy High Frequency Dictionary Design

This technique minimizes the storage requirement to represent a dictionary of most often used words in a language-independent manner. A technique for improving the performance of spelling verification on systems which must keep the related dictionary data base on secondary storage is to make use of an in- storage list of the most frequently used words in a language. A relatively small number of words typically can be used to validate the spelling of a very high percentage of words used in text. The present technique is to use the identical structure of the main dictionary on secondary storage for the high frequency dictionary. The high frequency dictionary is then actually stored in an independent segment of the main dictionary. This ensures that the techniques used to minimize the storage required for the main dictionary will also apply to the high frequency dictionary. A dictionary built using the design technique described in the preceding article can easily be extended to contain within it independent relational data base segments which contain various types of data which are associated with the words in the main dictionary. An example of this is the technique used for storing parts-of-speech data described in * Applications which require the parts of speech for many words, such as one which analyzes running text, could suffer serious performance problems when accessing this data, if a reference to secondary...