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Suffix-Dependent Dictionary Recognition Level Data Storage Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042325D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carlgren, RG: AUTHOR

Abstract

This technique minimizes the storage requirement to represent word recognition level data for a list of words encoded using a stem word and suffix list storage technique. An efficient technique for storing a large list of words having the same base language is to represent common variations of stem words as a list of suffix variations. To ensure optimum performance and storage use, information related to the stored word list should be isolated in a relational data base which should be included as an independent segment of the basic word list dictionary.

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Suffix-Dependent Dictionary Recognition Level Data Storage Technique

This technique minimizes the storage requirement to represent word recognition level data for a list of words encoded using a stem word and suffix list storage technique. An efficient technique for storing a large list of words having the same base language is to represent common variations of stem words as a list of suffix variations. To ensure optimum performance and storage use, information related to the stored word list should be isolated in a relational data base which should be included as an independent segment of the basic word list dictionary. With such a dictionary data base design, for word recognition levels of all words in the dictionary to be represented, it must be possible to represent the recognition levels of stem words and also those of any words which are represented as stem variant words in the main dictionary. The recognition levels for main dictionary stem words are represented as described in the preceding article. The main dictionary word list is stored as described in [*]. A characteristic of all languages is that common variations on most stem words are recognized at the same level as the stem word itself. This fact can be exploited by storing the recognition level for a stem variant word only when it is known to be different from that of the stem word. The description of recognition level storage allows fifteen unique recognition levels to be represented in a binary...