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Corrosion-Protective Solder Coating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042331D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rice, JL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a solder coating which provides corrosion protection to a steel plate as well as an electrically conductive area which can be used for subsequent grounding. To produce an electrically conductive, corrosion-protected area on the steel plate, the area must first be mechanically and solvent cleaned to remove rust and oils. The area is then coated with a zinc chloride flux paste. A solder preform is placed in position. A heat source, such as a torch or an induction coil, is used to reflow the solder, which then adheres to the steel surface. A high tin solder, such as 95% tin - 5% antimony, may be used so that the oxides which form will be conductive tin oxides. The remainder of the steel structure can then be painted or finished, as desired. The use of a solder preform provides several advantages.

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Corrosion-Protective Solder Coating

This article describes a solder coating which provides corrosion protection to a steel plate as well as an electrically conductive area which can be used for subsequent grounding. To produce an electrically conductive, corrosion- protected area on the steel plate, the area must first be mechanically and solvent cleaned to remove rust and oils. The area is then coated with a zinc chloride flux paste. A solder preform is placed in position. A heat source, such as a torch or an induction coil, is used to reflow the solder, which then adheres to the steel surface. A high tin solder, such as 95% tin - 5% antimony, may be used so that the oxides which form will be conductive tin oxides. The remainder of the steel structure can then be painted or finished, as desired. The use of a solder preform provides several advantages. A controlled amount of solder only is applied. A predetermined plane geometry, strip, round, etc., of solder may be applied. This is an easier method for applying solder than brush-soldering techniques. The above-described technique also allows for automation in that solder preforms, once placed, can be heated and reflowed by robotic equipment.

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