Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Three-Layer Electron-Beam Resist With High Sensitivity and Contrast

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042347D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gregor, LV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described here is a high-resolution, high-sensitivity electron beam resist for direct pattern generation or mask fabrication. The resist comprises a three-layer structure of: 1. A base layer for planarization and process stability, such as about 1.5 u polysulfone; 2. A barrier layer for image transfer, such as about 0.1 u silicon oxide (CVD); 3. An image layer of about 0.4 to about 0.7 u of polyfluorinated butyl methacrylate (FBM), as available from Orlex Corp. The structure is shown in the drawing.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Three-Layer Electron-Beam Resist With High Sensitivity and Contrast

Described here is a high-resolution, high-sensitivity electron beam resist for direct pattern generation or mask fabrication. The resist comprises a three-layer structure of: 1. A base layer for planarization and process stability, such as about
1.5 u polysulfone; 2. A barrier layer for image transfer, such as about 0.1 u silicon oxide (CVD); 3. An image layer of about 0.4 to about 0.7 u of polyfluorinated butyl methacrylate (FBM), as available from Orlex Corp. The structure is shown in the drawing. The presence of fluorine substituent atoms in the molecular structure of FBM causes it to be extremely sensitive to electron bombardment, resulting in chain scission and solubility in developers, such as, MIBK-IPA (methyl isobutyl ketone-isopropyl alcohol) mixtures; the unexposed FBM is essentially insoluble in MIBK/IPA, so R/Ro is essentially infinite. However, the unexposed film is apparently swelled by small quantities of H2O in the developer, causing stress and subsequent cracking and wrinkling of the resist. Hence, it is essential to dry the developer before use. It is possible to do this by storing the developer over an insoluble drying agent (e.g., MgSO4) before use.

1