Browse Prior Art Database

Means for Detecting Entry Errors on a Video Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042357D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berghorn, CR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When a person enters text or program statements on a terminal, he or she is likely to make typographical errors. Currently, the only way to detect such errors is by processing the data with a program after the data has been entered. This processing may be performed by a text editor, a compiler or an application program. By using different colors, blinking, reverse video or other similar methods, to highlight the different types of text being entered, many errors can be detected at the time that they are made. This allows errors to be corrected immediately, without wasting further computer time on more complex processing of the data.

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Means for Detecting Entry Errors on a Video Terminal

When a person enters text or program statements on a terminal, he or she is likely to make typographical errors. Currently, the only way to detect such errors is by processing the data with a program after the data has been entered. This processing may be performed by a text editor, a compiler or an application program. By using different colors, blinking, reverse video or other similar methods, to highlight the different types of text being entered, many errors can be detected at the time that they are made. This allows errors to be corrected immediately, without wasting further computer time on more complex processing of the data. For the sake of simplicity, this invention will be described as it applies to intelligent text editors (color editors) which examine the text and specify the color of each character to be displayed, as well as intelligent terminals which determine the color of the characters to be displayed after receiving the text from a mono-color text editor running on a host computer. Blinking, reverse video and other methods can also be used to implement this invention on a mono-color or color display. This article presents two methods of implementation. The first method is a pure software implementation, while the second requires a hardware/firmware implementation. Video terminals are widely used for the entry of data into computer systems. This data may take the form of text (e.g., a letter or memo), program statements (e.g., a FORTRAN or PL/I program), or pure data to be used by a program in the course of its execution. It is not unusual for the operator of the terminal to make errors when entering data on the terminal. The errors may either be typographical errors or syntax errors. These errors usually go undetected until the data is processed by a program at some time in the future. When such processing does take place, error messages are produced and the user is then required to go back and edit the data once again to correct the errors. After correcting the errors, he/she may process the data once again. This procedure may be repeated several times if more errors are found. Color terminals, such as the IBM 3279, have been available for several years. Little use of color has been made, however, in the area of data entry. Where color has been used, it has been used to highlight the various fields on the display. The entire text input area might be in one color, while the command input area might be in a second color, and areas where the operator is not permitted to type might be in a third color. Rather than displaying the data being entered all in one color, this invention uses color to highlight various parts of the data. Through such a use of color, certain types of typographical errors and syntax errors become highly and im...