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Determining Relative Solubilities of Gases in Liquids

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042369D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shoberg, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

This method determines relative concentrations of dissolved gases in liquid streams by theoretical analysis of frictional losses within piping systems. It has particular utility as a troubleshooting technique on tank farms. The method includes the following steps: 1. Set pressure on liquid reservoir 10 of the drawing using a pressure source, such as gas cylinder 15. 2. Record the actual flow rate under the following conditions: a. Initial surge in flow (i.e., flow rate is taken before outgassing occurs). b. Steady-state flow rate. 3. Calculate "K" values for initial surge and steady-state conditions. The difference in "K" values is proportional to the amount of gas released from solution. The "K" factor is a friction loss coefficient that takes into account eddies in the line.

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Determining Relative Solubilities of Gases in Liquids

This method determines relative concentrations of dissolved gases in liquid streams by theoretical analysis of frictional losses within piping systems. It has particular utility as a troubleshooting technique on tank farms. The method includes the following steps: 1. Set pressure on liquid reservoir 10 of the drawing using a pressure source, such as gas cylinder 15. 2. Record the actual flow rate under the following conditions: a. Initial surge in flow (i.e., flow rate is taken before outgassing occurs). b. Steady-state flow rate. 3. Calculate "K" values for initial surge and steady-state conditions. The difference in "K" values is proportional to the amount of gas released from solution. The "K" factor is a friction loss coefficient that takes into account eddies in the line. Note that laboratory apparatus can be used to determine relative solubilities of many different fluids. This method makes it possible to develop an equation or correction factor for Bernoulli's equation. Bernoulli's equation, of course, is used to determine theoretical flow rates and pressure drops for piping systems. Static pressure differences and dynamic pressure drop through the pipe cause outgassing of dissolved gases which forms eddies in the line. Comparison of "K" values for different chemicals under the proper conditions yields information on the solubility of the propulsion gas in the liquid. Once the problem is identified as g...