Browse Prior Art Database

Self-Defining Cables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042425D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Voigt, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Automatic configuration of multiported, multifunctional circuit cards is provided. The cards need to be able to identify the type of interface to which they are connected. This is accomplished by using self-defining cables. Self-defining (self-configurating) cables are cables which contain all the necessary information for an adapter card to configure the interface/port. The cable 1 (Fig. 1) has an adapter cable connector 2, a device cable connector 3 and performs this function through the use of a serial-bit read-only storage (ROS) or equivalent logic mounted on the cable. The serial-bit ROS or equivalent logic has four connections on lines 5-8 as follows: voltage, ground, serial data and strobe. The data and strobe could be made available at both ends of the cable.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 64% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Self-Defining Cables

Automatic configuration of multiported, multifunctional circuit cards is provided. The cards need to be able to identify the type of interface to which they are connected. This is accomplished by using self-defining cables. Self-defining (self-configurating) cables are cables which contain all the necessary information for an adapter card to configure the interface/port. The cable 1 (Fig. 1) has an adapter cable connector 2, a device cable connector 3 and performs this function through the use of a serial-bit read-only storage (ROS) or equivalent logic mounted on the cable. The serial-bit ROS or equivalent logic has four connections on lines 5-8 as follows: voltage, ground, serial data and strobe. The data and strobe could be made available at both ends of the cable. Each time the strobe line is pulsed, a bit of data is placed on the serial data line 7. The ROS is strobed once for each bit of data until all data is transferred. The information on the serial data line 7 is now available at the adapter port through connector 2. This serial information is assembled into words of appropriate length by the adapter. The assembled words describe the interface and provide error checking. If a single chip serial-bit ROS is designed specifically for this application, consideration should be given to mounting the chip on the cable connector. An example of a SLT (solid logic technology) cable connector used in this fashion is shown in Fig. 2 with chip 10...