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Formatter for Formula Output

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042461D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bluethman, RG: AUTHOR

Abstract

The design of a formatter for use in a word processing system which can transform a natural language input into conventionally printed single or multiline formulas is described. The natural language input is described in the preceding article. The following assumptions apply to the formatter herein described: 1. The input data conforms to the formula method shown in the preceding article. 2. Parsing into elements of the formula is done as described in the preceding article. 3. A memory matrix is used which has a character position for each character on a row, and a row of characters at each half-index position (i.e., for each half line). On output, subscripted and superscripted characters may be employed. 4.

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Formatter for Formula Output

The design of a formatter for use in a word processing system which can transform a natural language input into conventionally printed single or multiline formulas is described. The natural language input is described in the preceding article. The following assumptions apply to the formatter herein described: 1. The input data conforms to the formula method shown in the preceding article. 2. Parsing into elements of the formula is done as described in the preceding article. 3. A memory matrix is used which has a character position for each character on a row, and a row of characters at each half-index position (i.e., for each half line). On output, subscripted and superscripted characters may be employed. 4. At the completion of the formatting process, this memory matrix will be outputted in a manner appropriate to a particular output device. The basic approach is to format the line left to right, an element at a time. Whenever an element causes a shift in the base line of the formula, then the formatter shifts the previously completed elements down in memory. The base line is the line on which are located the element delimiters, such as the equal sign and the arithmetic operators between elements. This is not easily described by means of an example. See Fig. 1. The input expression is: F = INT (A,B) (1+2x OVER (3Z+C)) dx This is parsed into two elements, separated by the equal sign. The initial base line is on the second line of the memory matrix. The figures depict the memory matrix of half-line intervals; the characters will be printed or displayed with half-indexing as required. The integration indices a and b are placed in the subscript and superscript positions. Normal processing continues until the numerator term of an "OVER" control is reached. The formatter scans ahead after each potential delimiter to see if another control must be processed. When the "OVER" control is found, then the numerator and denominator are delimited as previously described. The base line is shifted down one half line, which means shifting all previous elements and delimiters down. The...