Browse Prior Art Database

Variable-Length Case Shift and Alternate Mode Selection Using Single Shift Key

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042539D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chodorow, MS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This method of shift selection enables a keyboard operator to select a case shift for a single character or a chosen succession of characters, or shift to an alternate set of key symbols, by the use of only one shift key, thereby making available for other purposes the additional keys that ordinarily would be involved in performing these various shift functions. Alphanumeric keyboards customarily include several shift keys. At least one shift key is provided for enabling the operator to select between upper case and lower case characters. When this key is depressed into its lower position, the character then being entered from the keyboard is a capitalized or upper case character.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Variable-Length Case Shift and Alternate Mode Selection Using Single Shift Key

This method of shift selection enables a keyboard operator to select a case shift for a single character or a chosen succession of characters, or shift to an alternate set of key symbols, by the use of only one shift key, thereby making available for other purposes the additional keys that ordinarily would be involved in performing these various shift functions. Alphanumeric keyboards customarily include several shift keys. At least one shift key is provided for enabling the operator to select between upper case and lower case characters. When this key is depressed into its lower position, the character then being entered from the keyboard is a capitalized or upper case character. If this case shift is to be prolonged for a succession of characters, another key, called a shift lock key, must be actuated to hold the first shift key in its lower position, or else the shift key must be held down by one finger while the succession of upper case characters is being entered. Modern keyboards may provide shift keys on both right and left sides of the main keyset. A lock key is provided on the left side and sometimes, also, on the right side of the keyboard. In addition, keyboards associated with computer terminals often have an "alternate" (or "alternate mode") key which, when actuated, causes a different set of symbols to be assigned to the keys on the board, the primary alphanumerics usually being printed on the tops of the keys, and the secondary or alternate symbols being printed on the front vertical key surfaces. This alternate mode key often is located on the right side of the keyboard where a second lock key otherwise might have been placed. Thus, keys which are assigned to the functions of selecting between lower case and upper case characters, determining the duration of the upper case character string when selected, or selecting between primary and secondary symbols, may account for three or four of the limited number of keys in a keyboard. Considering the physical limitations of most keyboards, an alternative design which would reduce this number to only one shift key for performing all of the shift functions mentioned above is very desirable, because it would free two or three keys to use for other purposes without requiring any redesign of existing keyboards. It is proposed here...