Browse Prior Art Database

Robot-Scheduling Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042563D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frohlich, JG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Currently, robots are programmed to respond to tasks in a fixed sequence. This program allows a robot to perform tasks nonsequentially based on the priority and availability of parts for a variety of tasks. The program will be implemented on an IBM Robot System/1 and programmed in AML, an IBM robotics language. The robot will have approximately 10 tasks on the work surface. A priority will be calculated for all the tasks. This priority is based on the daily going rate, the number of parts behind schedule, and the number of good parts processed. Basically, the task that provides assemblies that are needed the most has the highest priority. The basic flow chart (Fig. 1) shows the normal job flow. Priorities are calculated, and the job with the highest priority that has parts is performed.

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Robot-Scheduling Program

Currently, robots are programmed to respond to tasks in a fixed sequence. This program allows a robot to perform tasks nonsequentially based on the priority and availability of parts for a variety of tasks. The program will be implemented on an IBM Robot System/1 and programmed in AML, an IBM robotics language. The robot will have approximately 10 tasks on the work surface. A priority will be calculated for all the tasks. This priority is based on the daily going rate, the number of parts behind schedule, and the number of good parts processed. Basically, the task that provides assemblies that are needed the most has the highest priority. The basic flow chart (Fig. 1) shows the normal job flow. Priorities are calculated, and the job with the highest priority that has parts is performed. One of the advantages of this program is that when a task has inherent delays where the robot would be idle, an alternate task can be selected to improve the robot usage (Fig. 2). In this flowchart we have a job that contains two pauses. During this time in which the robot would normally be idle, it selects the job with the next highest priority and performs it. This robot will be operating on a production floor where the flow into the various tasks that the robot performs vary considerably. A priority-based scheduling program allows the robot to adapt to the fluctuations in the number of parts inputted to the tasks and still operate efficiently.

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