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Browse Prior Art Database

Universal EPROM Programmer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042573D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mansfield, SK: AUTHOR

Abstract

The technique and device described herein provide cost effective adaptation for electronically programming many different types of EPROM's (Electronically Programmable Read-Only Memories). The device, termed a UEP (Universal EPROM Programmer), is microprogram-controlled and directable by commands sent from a host processor. Figs. 1A and 1B, positioned as shown in Fig. 1, illustrate this UEP device. Microprocesor controller 1 (e.g., the Intel 8085) accepts commands from a processor (not shown) (e.g., an IBM Series/1 processor), at its command input port 2 and, with microprogram information stored in its internal memories 1A and 1B, operates its "programmer bus" interface 3 for programming an EPROM attached to one of its socket zero insertion force adapters 4-5 and 6.

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Universal EPROM Programmer

The technique and device described herein provide cost effective adaptation for electronically programming many different types of EPROM's (Electronically Programmable Read-Only Memories). The device, termed a UEP (Universal EPROM Programmer), is microprogram-controlled and directable by commands sent from a host processor. Figs. 1A and 1B, positioned as shown in Fig. 1, illustrate this UEP device. Microprocesor controller 1 (e.g., the Intel 8085) accepts commands from a processor (not shown) (e.g., an IBM Series/1 processor), at its command input port 2 and, with microprogram information stored in its internal memories 1A and 1B, operates its "programmer bus" interface 3 for programming an EPROM attached to one of its socket zero insertion force adapters 4-5 and 6. Socket adapter 6 connects to a "native" EPROM which has a direct and fixed physical association with the programmer bus 3, whereas socket 4-5 consists of a fixed socket portion 5 and a manually replaceable "personality" jumpered portion 4 which establishes an arbitrary connection association between lines in the programmer bus and lines of one of many "non-native" EPROMs attachable to the socket portion 5. As shown in Figs. 2 and 3, personality socket 4 contains 81 openings (in a 9 x 9 array) extending from top surface 4a to bottom surface 4b. Pin-terminated lines from the programmed bus and socket 5 interfaces are plugged into the bottom surface openings (41 lines from the...