Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Scanner Communications Using Wand Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042592D
Original Publication Date: 1984-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Broockman, EC: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article suggests a technique for connecting an optical scanner to a point-of-sale terminal via a wand interface rather than a special- purpose scanner interface. The scanner supplies an idealized pulse stream signal representing a decoded label to the wand interface. A wand interface microprocessor processes this signal as if it originated with a wand rather than the scanner. Point-of-sale terminals typically include wand adapters to permit an analog or digital wand to serve as an input device. The wand adapter accepts signals from the wand, counts pulse widths, and identifies label candidates. Point-of-sale terminals may also include special- purpose scanner adapters.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Optical Scanner Communications Using Wand Interface

This article suggests a technique for connecting an optical scanner to a point-of- sale terminal via a wand interface rather than a special- purpose scanner interface. The scanner supplies an idealized pulse stream signal representing a decoded label to the wand interface. A wand interface microprocessor processes this signal as if it originated with a wand rather than the scanner. Point-of-sale terminals typically include wand adapters to permit an analog or digital wand to serve as an input device. The wand adapter accepts signals from the wand, counts pulse widths, and identifies label candidates. Point-of-sale terminals may also include special- purpose scanner adapters. A scanner which is connected to this scanner adapter would typically perform all of the above- enumerated functions, but would also decode input signals and deliver a numeric representation of the label to the terminal. Referring to the drawing, a microprocessor in scanner 10 would be programmed to perform the normal functions of locating, selecting and decoding label candidates. Instead of providing a string of numeric values representing the label, however, the scanner would provide an idealized stream of pulses representative of the widths of the bars and spaces in the selected candidate. The pulse stream would be applied to a wand interface circuit 12 including a wand microprocessor 14. The wand microprocessor would perform the functions...