Browse Prior Art Database

Thermoelectrically Cooled Module

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042608D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Skobern, JR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes the use of thermoelectric technology utilizing the Peltier effect to provide cooling of high-power integrated circuits. The advantage of using thermoelectrically cooled modules instead of air-moving devices is to extend the operational environment, increase power and speed of operation due to greater heat dissipation, and eliminate problems of internal blower units. The module, as shown in the drawing, consists of integrated circuit chips 3 bonded to module substrate 5 with standard solder-ball-type interconnections 4. The module-connecting pins 1 for power and signal distribution are embedded in the module substrate 5 to allow interconnection to a second level carrier, such as a printed circuit card. The module cap 2 seals the chips from environmental contamination.

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Thermoelectrically Cooled Module

This article describes the use of thermoelectric technology utilizing the Peltier effect to provide cooling of high-power integrated circuits. The advantage of using thermoelectrically cooled modules instead of air-moving devices is to extend the operational environment, increase power and speed of operation due to greater heat dissipation, and eliminate problems of internal blower units. The module, as shown in the drawing, consists of integrated circuit chips 3 bonded to module substrate 5 with standard solder-ball-type interconnections 4. The module-connecting pins 1 for power and signal distribution are embedded in the module substrate 5 to allow interconnection to a second level carrier, such as a printed circuit card. The module cap 2 seals the chips from environmental contamination. With the module substrate 5 as an integral part of thermoelectric module 6, power applied to circuit chips 4 will cause heat to be absorbed into upper substrate 9 while substrate 5 becomes cooled, due to the Peltier effect. Heat sink 8 is bonded to upper substrate 9 with a thin thermally conductive interface 7. Voltage is supplied to thermoelectric devices 10 through the connector pins 1 and electrical interconnections on the thermoelectric module 6. The number of thermoelectric devices and module size is dependent on the number of circuits to be packaged and the amount of heat to be dissipated. However, a thermoelectrically cooled module is abl...