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Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Loader for Integrated Circuit Module Storage Tubes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042609D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davis, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An automatic loading machine is disclosed to load shipping tubes with semiconductor modules. Fig. 1 is a side view of the tube loader, wherein semiconductor modules are advanced along the path 1 to the loader 2. A plurality of storage tubes 3, shown in end view in Fig. 2, are sequentially mounted on a rotating drum 4. A side view of the rotating drum 4 is shown in Fig. 3, which also shows the relative position of one of the storage tubes 3. As seen in Fig. 2, there are four operating stations through which a storage tube 3 is moved by the rotating drum 4. Station A is where storage tubes are sequentially loaded onto the drum 4, station B is the station where modules are loaded into the tube 3, station C is where the end of the tube 3 is capped, and station D is where the filled and capped tube is removed from the drum 4. Fig.

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Automatic Loader for Integrated Circuit Module Storage Tubes

An automatic loading machine is disclosed to load shipping tubes with semiconductor modules. Fig. 1 is a side view of the tube loader, wherein semiconductor modules are advanced along the path 1 to the loader 2. A plurality of storage tubes 3, shown in end view in Fig. 2, are sequentially mounted on a rotating drum 4. A side view of the rotating drum 4 is shown in Fig. 3, which also shows the relative position of one of the storage tubes 3. As seen in Fig. 2, there are four operating stations through which a storage tube 3 is moved by the rotating drum 4. Station A is where storage tubes are sequentially loaded onto the drum 4, station B is the station where modules are loaded into the tube 3, station C is where the end of the tube 3 is capped, and station D is where the filled and capped tube is removed from the drum 4. Fig. 4 is another view of the loader 2, showing how the empty storage tubes 3 are stacked in the guides 5 above the position or station A of the drum 4. As the drum 4 is driven into rotation by the eight-position stepping motor 6, one of the grooves 7 in the drum 4 is positioned at station A so as to accept the next tube 3 in the guides 5. As the stepping motor indexes by one-eighth of a complete rotation, the tube 3 which was loaded at station A is moved to station B which aligns the tube 3 with the path 1 for the train of modules to be loaded. As the modules are loaded, the tube fills...