Browse Prior Art Database

Position-Controlled Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042614D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lewis, CH: AUTHOR

Abstract

In viewing data in a small display the present approach uses scrolling or similar operations to move parts of the data into the display, which actually remains fixed . The method proposed here is that means be provided whereby the display is effectively moved as a means of indicating what data is to be displayed. Application 1: A rectangular display capable of holding several text characters is pivoted at the left end and attached to a data processing system in such a way that its position can be sensed by the system. When the display is horizontal, the system presents the data in the current line of stored text. When the user rotates the display to the vertical position the system presents the first few characters of the current line and several previous lines.

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Position-Controlled Display

In viewing data in a small display the present approach uses scrolling or similar operations to move parts of the data into the display, which actually remains fixed
. The method proposed here is that means be provided whereby the display is effectively moved as a means of indicating what data is to be displayed. Application 1: A rectangular display capable of holding several text characters is pivoted at the left end and attached to a data processing system in such a way that its position can be sensed by the system. When the display is horizontal, the system presents the data in the current line of stored text. When the user rotates the display to the vertical position the system presents the first few characters of the current line and several previous lines. Application 2: A display is mounted on a mouse, puck, or other device whose position and orientation can be sensed by the system in which the data is stored. The user moves the display over an area of the same shape and size as the stored data, for example, an 8 1/2 x 11 inch rectangle for a stored page of text. Whenever the display is moved by the user, the system displays the corresponding portion of the stored data. Benefits of the approach: (a) It is immediately clear what part of the data is being shown, unlike with scrolling or data in a fixed display. (b) Control of display is natural for the user.

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