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Controlling Vertical Column Depths

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042629D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hofmeister, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a multi-column environment, the last or right-most column often becomes the shortest of the column set, including being a plurality of lines shorter than the other columns in the balanceable set of columns. This arrangement is enhanced by providing multiple short columns such that the difference between a short column and an optimum column depth is minimized to but one line space. The top part of the drawing shows normal vertical column justification procedures, wherein the right-most column, column 3, is shorter than columns 1 and 2 by a plurality of lines. In accordance with the procedures set forth in this article, columns 2 and 3 are both shortened such that the depth differences between the columns are reduced to an absolute minimum.

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Controlling Vertical Column Depths

In a multi-column environment, the last or right-most column often becomes the shortest of the column set, including being a plurality of lines shorter than the other columns in the balanceable set of columns. This arrangement is enhanced by providing multiple short columns such that the difference between a short column and an optimum column depth is minimized to but one line space. The top part of the drawing shows normal vertical column justification procedures, wherein the right-most column, column 3, is shorter than columns 1 and 2 by a plurality of lines. In accordance with the procedures set forth in this article, columns 2 and 3 are both shortened such that the depth differences between the columns are reduced to an absolute minimum. During initial text distribution between three or more columns, the optimum column depth often results in a short third or right-most column. A break point (point where column depth is reduced) for adjusting the column depth from optimum to a short depth for reducing column depth differences is calculated by multiplying the number of columns times the interim column depth, i.e., the depth calculated for columns 1 and 2, for example, minus the total depth of the text. This difference is then divided by a line space value which indicates the number of columns which must be shortened to obtain the enhanced text distribution. As shown, column 1 is a break point resulting in columns 2A and 3A, bo...