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Non-Contact Optical Technique to Monitor Buffing of Magnetic Disk Coatings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042663D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mastrangelo, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the process of buffing magnetic disk coatings there does not exist a rapid method to insure that the desired surface finish is reached. Besides thickness, surface finish is an important measure of the quality of the final coating surface. In actual practice, a series of setup disks are made and the buffing parameters needed to achieve a specified buffed condition are found empirically. Then the actual production disks are all processed using the same buffing parameters, but often the same end finish is not reached. The setup procedure is slow and not well reproduced during the production run. This article describes a method to rapidly monitor online the change in the surface finish of each disk. This would provide an independent measure of the buffing procedure.

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Non-Contact Optical Technique to Monitor Buffing of Magnetic Disk Coatings

In the process of buffing magnetic disk coatings there does not exist a rapid method to insure that the desired surface finish is reached. Besides thickness, surface finish is an important measure of the quality of the final coating surface. In actual practice, a series of setup disks are made and the buffing parameters needed to achieve a specified buffed condition are found empirically. Then the actual production disks are all processed using the same buffing parameters, but often the same end finish is not reached. The setup procedure is slow and not well reproduced during the production run. This article describes a method to rapidly monitor online the change in the surface finish of each disk. This would provide an independent measure of the buffing procedure. The method uses a Leitz Orthoplan microscope including two special optical components. The first is a Leitz MPV photometer accessory and the second is a Leitz Ultropak Dark Field Illumination accessory. The photometer head has a space to hold a wavelength- isolating interference filter. Using a narrow bandpass interference filter provides the best sensitivity in the visible wavelength region. The basic arrangement is shown in the figure. Verification of the method was made by studying four disks from the same ink batch that had been buffed intentionally to different surface finishes. Incident illuminating light from the xenon la...