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Resonant Impact Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042722D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hall, S: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This publication describes a mode of operation wherein the coil of a no-work actuator may be driven so as to excite the natural frequency of impact between the spring-loaded armature and the paper.

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Resonant Impact Printing

This publication describes a mode of operation wherein the coil of a no-work actuator may be driven so as to excite the natural frequency of impact between the spring-loaded armature and the paper.

This technique drastically reduces the effective cycle time of no-work actuators, and simultaneously alleviates wear problems, without any alteration in mechanical design. Resonant operation of a no-work actuator consists of driving the buck-out coil of the actuator to excite the natural frequency of impact between the spring-loaded armature and the paper. When properly implemented, such excitation can achieve a rapid burst of impacts having uniform strength, without the usual necessity of resealing the armature against the pole-face after each impact. This greatly reduces the effective cycle time of the actuator. As a side benefit, the number of collisions between the armature and the pole-face is significantly decreased, thereby reducing wear. The structure of a commercial actuator (i.e., described in U.S. Patent 4,136,978) which can be used for resonant operation is shown in Fig. 1. When the buck-out coil 10 is off, the armature 12 is held against the pole-face 14 by the coil's permanent magnet, thereby storing energy in the flexures. When coil 10 is pulsed, the magnet releases, allowing the armature 12 and wire to fly toward the paper 16 against the platen 18. Fig. 2 illustrates the voltage input waveform to coil 10 for implementing resonan...