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Method for Generating Large Area, Uniform Efficiency, Holographic Recordings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042730D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sincerbox, GT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method for forming large area, uniform efficiency holograms is described which comprises illuminating the hologram area so that the two recording beams are formed, with one recording beam having an odd number of reflections with respect to the other recording beam. The hologram recording can be conveniently accomplished by directing a laser beam 10 to beamsplitter 12 to form recording beams 14 and 16. Recording beam 14 is reflected from mirrors 18 and 20 to direct beam 14 at an angle to recording member 22. Recording beam 16 is reflected from mirror 24 to direct beam 16 at an angle to the recording member 22. As shown in Fig.

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Method for Generating Large Area, Uniform Efficiency, Holographic Recordings

A method for forming large area, uniform efficiency holograms is described which comprises illuminating the hologram area so that the two recording beams are formed, with one recording beam having an odd number of reflections with respect to the other recording beam. The hologram recording can be conveniently accomplished by directing a laser beam 10 to beamsplitter 12 to form recording beams 14 and 16. Recording beam 14 is reflected from mirrors 18 and 20 to direct beam 14 at an angle to recording member 22. Recording beam 16 is reflected from mirror 24 to direct beam 16 at an angle to the recording member 22. As shown in Fig. 1, by making each sub-area overlap with its counterpart, the intensity ratio between the beams remains constant and independent of the actual light distribution (shown as a skewed Gaussian distribution in the figure). In Fig. 1, the angle between the beams at any given point is determined by the optical system and is independent of the light intensity distribution. Hence, the recording spatial frequency and the absolute location of the fringes are also independent of intensity. If the light distribution incident on beamsplitter 12 is smaller than the aperture and is altered in the two transverse directions during exposure without changing its direction, the light incident on the recording member 22 also moves. The resultant is an averaging of the exposure without...