Browse Prior Art Database

Lubricant Monitoring Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042743D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoo, SK: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Studies clearly show that many aspects of mechanical reliability of magnetic recording disks are greatly improved by increasing the lubricant quantity on the disk surface. Disks with low levels of lubricant, or no lubricant, do not meet reliability objectives. Triboelectric Measurements of Lubricated Disks Many triboelectric measurements have consistently shown that when the head contacts a lubricated disk, positive current is transferred to ground through the grounded head. On a delubed, or unlubed disk that is very clean, there is actually a small amount of negative current transfer to ground. The triboelectric current obtained is generated by the mechanical rubbing of the slider material against a data disk. A probe larger than a data head can measure the total area of the disk in fewer revolutions.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Lubricant Monitoring Device

Studies clearly show that many aspects of mechanical reliability of magnetic recording disks are greatly improved by increasing the lubricant quantity on the disk surface. Disks with low levels of lubricant, or no lubricant, do not meet reliability objectives. Triboelectric Measurements of Lubricated Disks Many triboelectric measurements have consistently shown that when the head contacts a lubricated disk, positive current is transferred to ground through the grounded head. On a delubed, or unlubed disk that is very clean, there is actually a small amount of negative current transfer to ground. The triboelectric current obtained is generated by the mechanical rubbing of the slider material against a data disk. A probe larger than a data head can measure the total area of the disk in fewer revolutions. Also, because of the larger area, more current is generated in the rubbing, giving a larger signal-to-noise ratio. In addition to monitoring the amount of lube on the disk, the very process of gently rubbing a probe on the disk can be made beneficial in the following ways: 1. Smoothing down of the lube This enhances the lube disposition on the disk, and acts as a final lube wipe-down, resulting in more lube coverage. 2. A final cleaning of the disk surface The probe, if cleaned frequently, can be used to remove disk surface contamination. 3. Disk cleanliness inspection If the dirt cleaned off the probe is monitored, a measure is obtained...