Browse Prior Art Database

Transparent Stop Alignment Jig

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042756D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ferris, KK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a side view of the existing ceramic substrate test assembly generally known as the deck test assembly. The test head 1 has many test probes 2 arranged in a generally square array so as to be aligned with the heads 4 of the pins 4' in the ceramic substrate 3 which is to be tested. In operation, the test assembly sequentially indexes ceramic substrates 3 so that the forwardmost substrate is stopped by the surface 6 of the test head stop 5. As seen in Fig. 2 in a top view, the stop 5 is projected into the path of motion for the substrate 3, thereby stopping the substrate 3 in the desired aligned position with the test probes 2 of the test head 1.

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Transparent Stop Alignment Jig

Fig. 1 shows a side view of the existing ceramic substrate test assembly generally known as the deck test assembly. The test head 1 has many test probes 2 arranged in a generally square array so as to be aligned with the heads 4 of the pins 4' in the ceramic substrate 3 which is to be tested. In operation, the test assembly sequentially indexes ceramic substrates 3 so that the forwardmost substrate is stopped by the surface 6 of the test head stop 5. As seen in Fig. 2 in a top view, the stop 5 is projected into the path of motion for the substrate 3, thereby stopping the substrate 3 in the desired aligned position with the test probes 2 of the test head 1. It has been found that because of the abrasive quality of the ceramic substrate 3, the surface 6 of the test head stop 5 tends to wear so that the stopping position for the ceramic substrate 3 becomes misaligned with the test probes 2 of the test head 1. This can cause a serious chip-damaging problem, for example, when a misaligned ceramic substrate 3 has the semiconductor chips thereon contacted by the test head. The position of the test head blocks the view of the stop 5, thus preventing any inspection of the alignment of the substrate pins with the test probes. The invention disclosed herein enables inspecting the surface 6 of the test head stop 5 by means of the transparent stop-alignment jig shown in Figs. 3 and 4. The transparent stop alignment jig comprises a transparent pl...