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Type Band With Braille Type Elements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042774D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Visentin, TJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

An engraved type band has conventional characters and Braille dots intermixed so that conventional and/or Braille printing can be performed without replacing the type band. Braille printing consists of groups of dots arranged in a prescribed format. Each group of dots called a Braille cell is made of six possible dots spaced as shown in Fig. 1. The type band 10, shown in Fig. 3 contains nine dots 11 each spaced at a different horizontal and/or vertical position on the band 10 with the same character spacing as the conventional characters, e.g., 12, which might include a period. To print, the dot characters 11 of the band would be stored in memory and called out in the same manner as the conventional characters 12.

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Type Band With Braille Type Elements

An engraved type band has conventional characters and Braille dots intermixed so that conventional and/or Braille printing can be performed without replacing the type band. Braille printing consists of groups of dots arranged in a prescribed format. Each group of dots called a Braille cell is made of six possible dots spaced as shown in Fig. 1. The type band 10, shown in Fig. 3 contains nine dots 11 each spaced at a different horizontal and/or vertical position on the band 10 with the same character spacing as the conventional characters, e.g., 12, which might include a period. To print, the dot characters 11 of the band would be stored in memory and called out in the same manner as the conventional characters 12. For example, one of the Braille dots 11 might be specified by hex code 31 in a data stream and would print or emboss a character similar to a period but raised above the base of the print line. Fig. 2 shows an enlarged version of three print positions P1, P2, P3 where the nine dots of type band 10 would be placed to form Braille characters. By placing or printing dots in the dot positions shown in Fig. 3, combinations of dots could be put together to form Braille cells.

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