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Browse Prior Art Database

Antilocking Gear Clutch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042858D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kroeker, EB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article shows and describes a technique allowing gears to mesh without a possibility of locking as a result of a flexible toothed segment made integral with one of the gears. In Fig. 1, gear 2 includes a flexible segment 4 having two teeth of the same pitch as the rest of gear 2 which is selectively latchable by means (not shown) into a nonrotating state. When it is desired to engage running gear 6, gear 2 is allowed to rotate counterclockwise. If its teeth are properly positioned for meshing with gear 6, the two gears engage successfully. If, however, teeth on gear 2 are not properly aligned with those on gear 6, the condition shown in Fig. 2 may result wherein the teeth on flexible segment 4 of gear 2 lock with those on gear 6.

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Antilocking Gear Clutch

This article shows and describes a technique allowing gears to mesh without a possibility of locking as a result of a flexible toothed segment made integral with one of the gears. In Fig. 1, gear 2 includes a flexible segment 4 having two teeth of the same pitch as the rest of gear 2 which is selectively latchable by means (not shown) into a nonrotating state. When it is desired to engage running gear 6, gear 2 is allowed to rotate counterclockwise. If its teeth are properly positioned for meshing with gear 6, the two gears engage successfully. If, however, teeth on gear 2 are not properly aligned with those on gear 6, the condition shown in Fig. 2 may result wherein the teeth on flexible segment 4 of gear 2 lock with those on gear 6. If those teeth remain locked, the pitch distance between the teeth on the flexible segment 4, as well as on the rest of gear 2, becomes shorter as the flexible segment is pushed away from gear 6. Proper engagement between the rest of the teeth on gear 2 and gear 6 can then occur. Either of the two teeth on flexible segment 4 may perform the mesh-enabling function. If at any time the teeth on segment 4 fall off the top of a tooth on gear 6, engagement is again obtained between gears 2 and 6. During initial counterclockwise motion of gear 2 the first tooth on flexible segment 4 may be driven past a tooth on gear 6. Proper gear phasing occurs as the valley between the two flexibly mounted teeth center on that to...