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Photoresist Slope Control by Adjusting the Sensitizer Concentration

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042865D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Badami, DA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is disclosed for controlling the developed photoresist slope profile by selecting and adjusting the photosensitizer concentration. In existing photolithographic processes it is very difficult to achieve relatively extreme photoresist slope angles (less than 45Œ and more than 75Œ) with currently available positive diazo-type photoresist materials. However, many semiconductor processes require a wide range of photoresist slope profiles. It has been found tht relatively shallow or relatively steep photoresist profiles can be produced by controlling the photosensitizer concentration in the photoresist material.

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Photoresist Slope Control by Adjusting the Sensitizer Concentration

A method is disclosed for controlling the developed photoresist slope profile by selecting and adjusting the photosensitizer concentration. In existing photolithographic processes it is very difficult to achieve relatively extreme photoresist slope angles (less than 45OE and more than 75OE) with currently available positive diazo-type photoresist materials. However, many semiconductor processes require a wide range of photoresist slope profiles. It has been found tht relatively shallow or relatively steep photoresist profiles can be produced by controlling the photosensitizer concentration in the photoresist material. A relatively higher photoactive compound concentration creates larger illumination gradients from the top to the bottom layers of the photoresist which in turn causes large differences in the development rates between the top and bottom layers of the photoresist, producing a relatively shallow photoresist angle. Conversely, a relatively lower photoactive compound concentration results in steeper photoresist angles.

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