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Antiglare Technique for Plasma Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000042945D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Parker, DE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Several techniques are commonly used to reduce the glare from the surfaces of cathode-ray tube faceplates. Most common among these techniques are frosted or roughened surfaces and quarter-wavelength thin film antireflection (AR) coatings. When applied to the flat surface of a plasma display panel, each technique has significant limitations. A frosted or roughened surface diffuses the reflected image, but it also reduces the resolution of the primary image on the display, i.e., characters, graphics, etc. While AR coatings greatly reduce the glare, the remaining low intensity reflected image is highly specular, tending to distract the viewer under certain lighting conditions.

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Antiglare Technique for Plasma Displays

Several techniques are commonly used to reduce the glare from the surfaces of cathode-ray tube faceplates. Most common among these techniques are frosted or roughened surfaces and quarter-wavelength thin film antireflection (AR) coatings. When applied to the flat surface of a plasma display panel, each technique has significant limitations. A frosted or roughened surface diffuses the reflected image, but it also reduces the resolution of the primary image on the display, i.e., characters, graphics, etc. While AR coatings greatly reduce the glare, the remaining low intensity reflected image is highly specular, tending to distract the viewer under certain lighting conditions. For plasma display panels, an optimum solution to this problem which combines the benefits of both glare reduction techniques is obtained by applying an AR coating over a frosted or roughened surface. This construction yields a display having a very low intensity reflected image that is diffused, while the resolution and intensity of the primary image remains within satisfactory limits. A further advantage of this construction is that the display surface is less prone to be marred by fingerprints, a particular problem when AR coatings are used alone.

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