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Method for Growing Ultra-Thin Insulating Layers on Metal or Silicide Films at Low Temperatures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043118D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cros, AM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article relates to the growth of thin, homogeneous oxide films on metal or silicides. The oxidation of silicon atoms in a metal-rich environment can proceed at very low temperatures in contrast to pure silicon which requires higher temperatures to oxidize to the same degree. Thus, a new process to grow silicon oxide on metal films is provided as described hereinbelow. Step 1: Fabricate a metal-rich silicide by shallow implantation of silicon atoms into the metallic substrate 10 (Fig. 1A) or, alternatively, by depositing a thin silicon film onto a metal substrate 10 (Fig. 2A) which, upon annealing, will produce a metal-rich silicide phase (Fig. 2B).

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Method for Growing Ultra-Thin Insulating Layers on Metal or Silicide Films at Low Temperatures

This article relates to the growth of thin, homogeneous oxide films on metal or silicides. The oxidation of silicon atoms in a metal-rich environment can proceed at very low temperatures in contrast to pure silicon which requires higher temperatures to oxidize to the same degree. Thus, a new process to grow silicon oxide on metal films is provided as described hereinbelow. Step 1: Fabricate a metal-rich silicide by shallow implantation of silicon atoms into the

metallic substrate 10 (Fig. 1A) or, alternatively,

by depositing a thin silicon film onto a metal

substrate 10 (Fig. 2A) which, upon annealing, will

produce a metal-rich silicide phase (Fig. 2B). Step 2:

Oxidize the sample at very low temperatures to produce a SiO2 layer on top of the

metal film (Figs. 1B, 2C). Thickness control can

be achieved by the amount of implanted or

deposited Si atoms and by the oxidation

temperature and time. Oxide layers formed at room temperature typically have thicknesses in the 10-30 A range. Higher oxidation temperatures produce thicker oxides. The advantages of the process are that the oxides can be grown at low temperature, good control of the oxide thickness can be achieved by the control of the number of implanted or deposited Si atoms, and the uniformity of the oxide layer depends on the uniformity of the silicide which generally is quite good. Potential applications for tunnel...