Browse Prior Art Database

Pinned Multilayer Ceramic Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043141D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Magee, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Multilayer ceramic integrated circuit packaging substrates having multiple internal wiring layers for interconnecting integrated circuits mounted on the top substrate surface are well known. Known multilayer ceramic substrates include an array of brazed input/output pins on the bottom surface. Disclosed herein is a multilayer ceramic substrate which includes staked pins which pass through the substrate in a manner heretofore employed for single-layer metallized ceramic integrated circuit packaging substrates. Fig. 1 illustrates a cross section of a pinned multilayer ceramic substrate 1 including internal wiring layers 2 and swaged and headed pins 3 which pass through substrate 1. Pins 3 may be inserted and headed using a known pinning machine, e.g., as disclosed in U.S. Patent 3,516,156.

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Pinned Multilayer Ceramic Substrate

Multilayer ceramic integrated circuit packaging substrates having multiple internal wiring layers for interconnecting integrated circuits mounted on the top substrate surface are well known. Known multilayer ceramic substrates include an array of brazed input/output pins on the bottom surface. Disclosed herein is a multilayer ceramic substrate which includes staked pins which pass through the substrate in a manner heretofore employed for single-layer metallized ceramic integrated circuit packaging substrates. Fig. 1 illustrates a cross section of a pinned multilayer ceramic substrate 1 including internal wiring layers 2 and swaged and headed pins 3 which pass through substrate 1. Pins 3 may be inserted and headed using a known pinning machine, e.g., as disclosed in U.S. Patent 3,516,156. All voltage and signal vias 4 are brought to the top surface where they are connected to the stacked pins by a conductive teardrop 5, a top view of which is shown in Fig. 2.

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