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Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Hard Particles in Top Coat of Direct Photonegative Made by Electro-Erosion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043185D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cohen, MS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The advantages of a graphite lubricant overlayer on a direct photonegative made by electro-erosion printing have been previously demonstrated. While the graphite tends to inhibit fouling, i.e., the buildup of debris on the styli during writing, the graphite may not totally suppress this undesirable phenomenon. It has been known that a rough surface can abrade debris away from the styli tips. It is therefore proposed that a small quantity of small, hard particles be added to the top coat. Candidates for such material are aluminum oxide particles of acicular shape from one to three micrometers in diameter, or more roundish silicon dioxide in the same size range.

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Use of Hard Particles in Top Coat of Direct Photonegative Made by Electro- Erosion

The advantages of a graphite lubricant overlayer on a direct photonegative made by electro-erosion printing have been previously demonstrated. While the graphite tends to inhibit fouling, i.e., the buildup of debris on the styli during writing, the graphite may not totally suppress this undesirable phenomenon. It has been known that a rough surface can abrade debris away from the styli tips. It is therefore proposed that a small quantity of small, hard particles be added to the top coat. Candidates for such material are aluminum oxide particles of acicular shape from one to three micrometers in diameter, or more roundish silicon dioxide in the same size range. It has been found that profilometer traces of the surfaces of such layers show roughnesses in the range of several micrometers, while good electroerosion writing still takes place. Such rough, hard surfaces should scour away the unwanted debris. The particles are held in a tough, hard overlayer which contains graphite for lubrication and electrical conductivity and has a crosslinked binder for toughness.

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