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Messages Stored in Macro

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043193D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feeley, PM: AUTHOR

Abstract

For ease in identifying and having control over messages, a solution is to have the messages and their identifiers (IDs) located in a module or in a macro. Using the macro approach rather than the module approach has the following advantages: 1) In large programs consisting of many modules that are being loaded into and out of memory, the message module would have to be in memory whenever a module requested a message from it. 2) If a message module were being used, it would have to be re-assembled when changes were made to it, and at the same time, all modules referring to a message in the message module would also have to be re-assembled. 3) For a message module, special routines must be coded to locate and use the message.

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Messages Stored in Macro

For ease in identifying and having control over messages, a solution is to have the messages and their identifiers (IDs) located in a module or in a macro. Using the macro approach rather than the module approach has the following advantages: 1) In large programs consisting of many modules that are being loaded into and out of memory, the message module would have to be in memory whenever a module requested a message from it. 2) If a message module were being used, it would have to be re-assembled when changes were made to it, and at the same time, all modules referring to a message in the message module would also have to be re-assembled. 3) For a message module, special routines must be coded to locate and use the message. Messages are obtained, using macro calls, from a common source defined within the macros as globals. Each message is set in a subscripted global set symbol. The assigned ID of the message is set in another subscripted global set symbol, using the same subscript value. The following scheme uses three macros, each defining the global set symbols that will contain the message ID, text and index value. The index value contains the subscript used for the ID. The source-program 10 issues control-macro 12 (GETMSG), passing to it, the message ID and any other parameters affecting the macro expansion. 1) For the first message request to control-macro 12 (GETMSG): A) Control-macro 12 (GETMSG) issues one or more

message-initialization-macros 14, 16

(MINIT1....MINITX). B) Each message-initialization-macro 14, 16 contains one or more calls to

set-message-macro 18 (SETMSG). Each call

consists of the message and its ID. C)

Set-message-macro 18 (SETMSG) increments the value in the index, defined as a global

symbol, by one, and, using this index value

as a subscript, sets the message ID and text

in the assigned subscripted global symbols. 2) Control-macro 12 searches the global symbol for the message ID requested by the source-program

10, and, upon finding it, uses the subscript value

to obtain the message text from the global symbol. 3) Using the message ID and message, the control-macro 12 expands into...