Browse Prior Art Database

Inexpensive Production of Chrome Photomasks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043215D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergendahl, AS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Chrome photomasks can be produced at room temperature and with high purity by using chromium carbonyl Cr(CO)6 and colliding it with either a photoelectron ejected from the quartz-vacuum interface by UV photons or with the UV photons themselves. A simple apparatus is used to accomplish this The Cr(CO)6 would be introduced into the chamber through an opening 11 directed away from the substrate and facing a "rough" wall as opposed to an optically polished surface. This will ensure that the molecules approaching the substrate will have velocity vectors which are purely statistical. The pumping port 12 is also located away from the substrate to reduce the perturbation of random molecular movement in the chamber to a minimum. Pressure in the range of 0.1 torr helps to satisfy this consideration even further.

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Inexpensive Production of Chrome Photomasks

Chrome photomasks can be produced at room temperature and with high purity by using chromium carbonyl Cr(CO)6 and colliding it with either a photoelectron ejected from the quartz-vacuum interface by UV photons or with the UV photons themselves. A simple apparatus is used to accomplish this The Cr(CO)6 would be introduced into the chamber through an opening 11 directed away from the substrate and facing a "rough" wall as opposed to an optically polished surface.

This will ensure that the molecules approaching the substrate will have velocity vectors which are purely statistical. The pumping port 12 is also located away from the substrate to reduce the perturbation of random molecular movement in the chamber to a minimum. Pressure in the range of 0.1 torr helps to satisfy this consideration even further. The actual deposition reaction is: Cr(CO)6 + e- T Cr + 6(CO) The electrons are photoelectrons ejected from the quartz 13 by UV photons (< 260 nm). Also contributing to the deposition is the direct UV irradiation induced decomposition. Cr(CO)6 + hq T Cr + 6(CO) The rate of deposition will depend on two major factors: 1. The Cr(CO)6 pressure which is easily controllable by temperature and does not require high vacuum

equipment. 2. The rate of photoelectron ejection and the photon

flux both of which are a function of: a. Incident photon flux. b. Amount of chrome deposited. The thicker the chrome is, the slower the deposition...