Browse Prior Art Database

Impact Ribbonless Color Printing With Dry Ink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043221D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lean, EG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

There are many existing techniques for impact ribbonless color printing, for example, magnetic mist, ball point pen, etc. All these techniques using wet ink have problems, such as the ink drying out causing a print component jamming problem when the system has not been used for a period of time. Also, the ink quality is sensitive to environmental conditions, such as humidity, temperature, etc., and wet ink sometimes causes paper-wetting and image-smearing problems. To overcome the above-mentioned problems, new impact matrix printer systems are described herein and which are schematically represented in Figs. 1 and 2. In Fig. 1, the magnetic toner particles 10 will be spread from a feeder 12 to a belt 14 by gravitational force or magnetic force with a guide.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Impact Ribbonless Color Printing With Dry Ink

There are many existing techniques for impact ribbonless color printing, for example, magnetic mist, ball point pen, etc. All these techniques using wet ink have problems, such as the ink drying out causing a print component jamming problem when the system has not been used for a period of time. Also, the ink quality is sensitive to environmental conditions, such as humidity, temperature, etc., and wet ink sometimes causes paper-wetting and image-smearing problems. To overcome the above-mentioned problems, new impact matrix printer systems are described herein and which are schematically represented in Figs. 1 and 2. In Fig. 1, the magnetic toner particles 10 will be spread from a feeder 12 to a belt 14 by gravitational force or magnetic force with a guide. With two or more feeders, toners with different colors can be used for color printing. Once the wire rotates to the belt position, for example, wire 16 in Fig. 1, the coil 24 can be energized and the toner particles will be attracted to the tip of the wire and will stay at the tip. The drum 18 continues to rotate. As wire 16 approaches position 20, three actions will be started: the impact actuator 22 will be fired; a high-temperature source heats the wire; and the coil 24 is being de-energized. When the hammer 26 hits the paper 28, the color toner particles will be strongly pressed inside the paper fibers due to the combined effect of the three processes described below. In the heat conduction process the conductive heat of the wire causes the toner resin to melt and adhere permanently to the paper support. This process will completely eliminate the complex heating-fusing techniques of presently known printers. In the high-impact pressing process, the hammer force could be 2 to 10 pounds for a 14-mil O.D. wire. Since the ribbon is eliminated, all of the kinetic energy will be transferred to the printing process. High-impact force will cause the toner particles to be pressed inside the paper fibers. In the magnetic flux alternation process, before impact, the toner particles were attracted to the wire tips by the coils. When the hammer hits the paper, the toner particles will be attracted to the paper due to the flux generated by the impact actuator. Due to the novel approach described herein of using the combined effect of these three above-mentioned processes, the toner particles will be permanently transferred to the paper and good quality printing will be produced. In addition to the system as shown in Fig. 1, a new electrostatic ribbonless impact printer system, as shown in Fig. 2, is proposed. The basic concepts for the two systems are the same. In this second system, electrostatic force is to be used to attract toner particles to the tip of the wires and to press them to the paper -- instead of using magnetic force as in the first system. Referring to Fig. 2, toner particles with different colors will be fed to a belt from se...