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Single-Step Chip Testing Contactor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043249D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jurjevic, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Several problems occur with regard to the existing chip handler systems. One problem is to maintain the alignment of the chip at the time it is picked up by the vacuum pencil. Currently, the chip's orientation can only be measured at a position on the vacuum pencil turret which is 180o away from the pickup point. However, it is the pickup point where the effect of the alignment must be made. Therefore, the process of alignment can be excessively long and tedious and still can be relatively unreliable.

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Single-Step Chip Testing Contactor

Several problems occur with regard to the existing chip handler systems. One problem is to maintain the alignment of the chip at the time it is picked up by the vacuum pencil. Currently, the chip's orientation can only be measured at a position on the vacuum pencil turret which is 180o away from the pickup point. However, it is the pickup point where the effect of the alignment must be made. Therefore, the process of alignment can be excessively long and tedious and still can be relatively unreliable. An additional problem which occurs with regard to the existing vacuum pencil turret approach for testing chips is that many chips must be tested at a specified elevated temperature and to do so, the vacuum pencil must be heated so that by the time the chip reaches the electrical testing point, the chip will have achieved its desired temperature. When a chip is picked up, it will oftentimes not lie squarely against the vacuum pencil and, therefore, the amount of heat delivered to the chip will not always be the same. Therefore, the resulting temperature of the chip at the time it is tested will not always be predictable. Thus, the resultant tests are not always reliable. These and other problems are solved by the single-step chip testing contactor which is shown in Figs. 1 through 3. The invention is to substitute a testing site at the pickup point 6 so that the chip is tested while still located at the track 4 instead of having to be picked up by the vacuum pencil and tested at a remote location. As seen in the side view of Fig. 1, the track 4 is mounted to the locater block 12 and a chip retainer 14 is mounted in a vertical sliding engagement with the locater block 12 at the end of the track 4. When a chip is delivered from the track 4 to the chip retainer 14 at the position 6, the chip stops at the end stop 36 and the existence of the chip at the end stop 36 is detected by the detector 34. When the presence of the chip 22 is detected, the vacuum pencil 40 is driven in a downward direction so as to physically contact the top surface of the chip 22. Since the chip 22 is supported by the lip 24 (Fig. 2) of the chip retainer 14 and, further, since the chip retainer 14 is mounted by means of compression springs 18 onto the chip locater block 1...