Browse Prior Art Database

Robot Overlay Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043256D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dunnington, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates to a method for externally controlling a selfcontained robot by way of suitably coded commands applied at the robot sensory ports given the absence of any intrinsic communication ports. The object is for a host computer to indirectly control an otherwise inaccessible robot system. The host gains access through the robot sensor I/O channels, synthesizing and transmitting codes which effectively "trick" the robot into performing certain motions. Referring now to Fig. 1, there is shown a normal robot setup involving a robot manipulator 1 in interactive relation with a robot controller 3. The controller is outported to motors and valves 5 and inported to switches and sensors 7.

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Robot Overlay Control

This invention relates to a method for externally controlling a selfcontained robot by way of suitably coded commands applied at the robot sensory ports given the absence of any intrinsic communication ports. The object is for a host computer to indirectly control an otherwise inaccessible robot system. The host gains access through the robot sensor I/O channels, synthesizing and transmitting codes which effectively "trick" the robot into performing certain motions. Referring now to Fig. 1, there is shown a normal robot setup involving a robot manipulator 1 in interactive relation with a robot controller 3. The controller is outported to motors and valves 5 and inported to switches and sensors 7. In the standard configuration the manipulator is directed by the robot controller and the user I/O lines operate external actuators and read sensors. Referring now to Fig. 2, the robot controller I/O (5,7) is terminated in the digital port 9 of a microprocessor 11. The microprocessor controls the robot through n-k lines forming path 7. The k remaining lines are used for synchronization. Path 5 includes a status line. Operationally, specific robot motions are taught by conventional means and stored in the robot control system with an I/O scan routine. The control program resides in the microprocessor. The control program coordinates robot motion by sending synthesized codes to the robot sensor I/O over path 7. Referring now to Fig. 3, there is shown...