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Minimum Storage of KEYBOARD to Print Symbol Translations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000043261D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-04
Document File: 5 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Scheibl, FJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes means by which an electronic typewriter may support multiple relationships between keyboard key locations and print graphics. A major use is to allow the electronics of a typewriter to maintain the correct relationship between the installed keyboard (or an operator selected alternative keyset) and a given print element or symbol. It allows one electronics package to support a variety of custom keyboards for world-wide marketing of a single machine. This is achieved by storing keyboard-to-symbol relationships once in a pattern preferably corresponding to one keyboard to be used. This pattern is rearranged by transformation instructions permanently stored for use with each of the other keyboards.

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Minimum Storage of KEYBOARD to Print Symbol Translations

This article describes means by which an electronic typewriter may support multiple relationships between keyboard key locations and print graphics. A major use is to allow the electronics of a typewriter to maintain the correct relationship between the installed keyboard (or an operator selected alternative keyset) and a given print element or symbol. It allows one electronics package to support a variety of custom keyboards for world-wide marketing of a single machine. This is achieved by storing keyboard-to-symbol relationships once in a pattern preferably corresponding to one keyboard to be used. This pattern is rearranged by transformation instructions permanently stored for use with each of the other keyboards. The instructions are minimized by rearranging to only two other keyboards from the starting keyboard, and so on in tree logic, until the desired keyboard rearrangement is reached. Electronic typewriters have the ability to support a wide variety of type styles and graphic sets by means of interchangeable print elements and "soft" keyboard arrangements. Implementation requires a means of translating the key position and upper/lower case status of the keyboard to a position on the print element (wheel or ball) or a storage location for a given graphic. In general, a means must be provided for selection of the desired mapping, and a translation mechanism must be activated so that the depression of a given key causes the selection of the proper location on the print element. Selection of the desired mapping can be accomplished in several ways. The keyboard itself, with graphics engraved on the keytops, implies a particular graphic set. If the electronics of the machine can identify the keyboard attached to the machine in some way, it can then set up the proper translation mechanism if the predetermined order of symbols is known. Alternatively, an operator can key in a code of some sort which instructs the machine to set up a different translation mechanism. The following example illustrates optimized storage efficiency for an arbitrary set of N keyboards to print translated graphic arrangements. Where a specific printer is referenced, one having a daisy wheel print element is assumed, this being illustrative. A stored pel matrix, whether in bit-by-bit or code-compressed form, corresponds to the daisy wheel, with the matrix for each symbol corresponding to each impact element on the finger of the daisy wheel. Each matrix is stored in memory, and addresses of the matrix for each symbol are translated as here described. This is achieved by conforming to the nature of the keyboard to print element relationship itself. In particular, all graphics available on a given print element are assumed to be accessible by a unique set of key depressions (e.g., shift key + "a" key selects upper case A on print element). This special relationship allows the key translations to opera...